Initial research on Kidney Failure

pg4aAs the screenwriter of the film ‘A bit about Frank’ it was important for me to carry out extensive research into the themes and subjects which appear in the narrative, in order to construct the scenes and the dialogue in the most believable manor possible. ‘Novice writers make the fatal mistake of neglecting research, and its not only about authenticity’ (John Costello 2002: 19). This is something I was initially guilty of, even though I do not consider myself to be a novice writer. I underwent minimal primary research into the subject of Kidney transplants and the complications of the operation but I did expand on this information to the depths which was required in the film. I spoke briefly to a Bio medical graduate about the film I was making and what I wanted to achieve. Once she gave me some brisk information on the topic I quickly went off on a tangent with the idea without doing further reading. This meant that my script had/ and still has some flaws that we will have to cover up in the final stages of filming/ editing, even though 60% of the film has already been shot which makes our job even harder. The information below is what I wrote the script around.

I will also note that this film was never suppose to be our FMP idea, but a short quick film for my company/ collective Our Notion Works to carry out in our spare time. Although due to the collapse of our documentary ’22 years later’ we quickly had to dust off this old idea and convert it into this amazing broadcast-able FMP. I do believe looking back in hindsight that if this was our initial FMP idea I would’ve developed my research plan making our film more believable and realistic. From a critical stand point I should’ve produced a substantial amount of research even if this was just a quick film idea, going forward I will make sure I undergo more research before I write scripts/ treatments. Before the end of this film I will do further research on the topic.

The text below was produced by our medical researcher after conversations with the writer/ director (Tosin Adjibola)

Case 1 – Patient had prostate enlargement which later developed into Chronic Kidney Disease

Prostate enlargement occurs in a third of all men over 50 and its therefore a condition associated with ageing. The prostate gland is a small gland found in men and it opens into the urethra ( the tube that carries urine) and sits below the bladder and vas deferens. When the prostate is enlarged it can put pressure on the urethra making it difficult for the bladder to empty.

The science applied to the film –

Unfortunately he didn’t respond to the medication and the prostate gland had to be removed but by now the kidneys had become affected, he needed a kidney transplant as well to surgically remove the prostate gland.

Case 2– patient has prostatitis, caused by an infection which caused the prostate gland to be inflamed however the infection was not found and medication was given to reduce the symptoms although the infection was present and spread to the kidney and affected the kidney function causing kidney disease, by the time it was noticed it was too late and the kidneys had begun to lose function over the years the function deteriorated and the patient needed a kidney transplant.

The science applied to the film –

The son wanting to donate his kidney to help has sickle cell disease making him less eligible to donate and would not be allowed to donate his kidney, however he decided to go ahead and do it on black market and during the operation he had a cardiac arrest on the operating table due to an air embolism but because the doctors were quack they couldn’t save his life and he died.

References

John Costello (2002). Writing a screenplay . Herefordshire: Pocket essentials . pg 19.

 

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